Monday, October 20, 2014

Is it time to hire a CCO?


While most of the marketing world is still fixated on the blurry lines that separate a CMO and CTO, a new role is emerging that may offer some clarification. Enter the Chief Customer Officer, the primary advocate for the end user and mediator on their behalf within the company.

According to a recent study by the CCO Council, "the chief customer officer is becoming a staple of modern business" and found that 22 percent of Fortune 200 companies have already adopted the role.

By its very existence, the CCO role demonstrates a significant change in the relationship between many companies and their customers.

First, it suggests companies know much more about their customers than ever before. Customer engagement programs, fueled by preference management, have collected vast amounts of information that help companies tailor experiences and personalize the customer journey.

Second, companies respect the rights and opinions of their customers. The very idea that customer would merit representation - in this case, a literal seat at the table - in company decision-making shows just how far some companies have gone to share ownership of the relationship.

If your company isn't ready for a CCO, think about the reasons why.

Not enough customer data to justify the position?

Not willing to share control of the relationship?

The arguments against a CCO may in fact reveal some shortcomings in your own engagement strategy.




About the Author: 
Rob Tate is the Director of Enterprise Sales at PossibleNOW.






Friday, October 17, 2014

Is Your Brand's Best Experience Within Arm's Reach?


A recent study conducted by Tapad and Forrester reveals that when it comes to doing business online, more than half (51 percent) of consumers choose the device they use based on whatever they're nearest to when they first become interested in a product or brand. This information should make marketers stop and consider whether all of their brands' touchpoints are effectively engaging the customer.

The study also shares that only 22 percent of users spend the entire time researching and purchasing products on the same platform, which is why it is critically important to make sure every customer experience is seamless and convenient - otherwise they'll go somewhere else.

Whoever your audience may be, here are two important things to remember when it comes to multichannel marketing:
  1. Convenience - Whether your customer is on a desktop, tablet, or mobile device, it's imperative that all their devices offer a streamlined customer experience. Because consumers bounce between devices, we as marketers must focus on all devices, not just one specific channel to enhance.

  2. Personalization - Preference management allows customers to control the conversation and indicate how they would like to be communicated with across all channels. If the customer relies heavily on their mobile device but don't see their choices reflected on the desktop, they will become frustrated and eventually seek a better experience elsewhere.
When brands embrace multi-channel marketing and focus on making a convenient and engaging experience across all devices, they will have greater customer satisfaction and improve their ROI.



Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Three Keys to Engaging Baby Boomers

By the end of 2015, baby boomers will represent 45 percent of the American population and control approximately 70 percent of the wealth.

Obviously, this is a powerful and important demographic for us to consider when planning marketing strategies. Conventional wisdom holds that boomers lag their younger, faster, and more technologically proficient millennial counterparts when it comes to digital engagement. However, an estimated 79 percent of them regularly use the Internet. Because of this, we as marketers must find ways to optimize their experience and appeal to their preferences.




  1. Get to know your audience: Preference management - the active collection, maintenance and distribution of unique consumer characteristics, such as product interest, communication channel preference and frequency of communication - goes a long way with baby boomers. Seeing that the brand they did business with six months ago still remembers who they are, what they bought and what else might appeal to them is greatly appreciated.
  2. Educate your audience: Boomers are more receptive to learning how they can enhance and personalize their online experience than most would expect. When brands empower baby boomers to control their own experience, they are gaining the respect and trust of a generation that values good service. Savvy companies seeking a boomer-specific audience leverage oversize fonts, easily navigable interfaces and intuitive controls to help them through the personalization process. 
  3. Respect your audience: While baby boomers are far from technically illiterate, they are not exploring evolving social media channels that many millennials have come to embrace. If you know that your audience is not tweeting about their experience, liking your brand’s latest Facebook post, or Instagramming their latest purchase, don’t waste time trying to get them to adopt those channels. As marketers, we must respect the means of communication that baby boomers are most comfortable using.


Bottom line: boomers spend an estimated $2.9 trillion a year . If that’s not encouragement to spend a little extra time and energy on appealing to a specific demographic, I’m not sure what is. With preference management, baby boomers are an exciting and attainable audience to appeal to. When baby boomers can do business with a brand that personalizes their experience, empowers them to take control and respects their preferred channels, brands will be successful in winning them over.



Eric Tejeda is the Director of Product Marketing for PossibleNOW and CompliancePoint. Eric supports the organization’s growth objectives by productizing and launching innovative new products and services that fill critical needs in the marketplace. 

With 25 years of experience, Eric firmly believes that permission-based marketing and preference management is a mega trend and the path to success for marketers today. 

Follow me on Twitter: @EricTejeda | Connect on LinkedIn: Eric Tejeda